B&B Complex Native Plants and Animals

Two black-tail bucks graze on spring grass near Metolius River, May 15, 2004

 

This webpage will be used to document wildlife habitat types and specific plants and animals associated with the aftermath of the B&B Complex Fire.

Wildlife Habitat

Insects and Diseases

Native Plants

Native Animals

Invasive Species

 

Wildlife Habitat

Wildfire events can dramatically influence native animal populations. Few large animals die in wildfires. Smaller terrestrial animals unable to outrun an intensive fire path, including mammals, reptiles, and amphibians, may perish unless they are able to burrow underground. A depth of as little as five cm.of soil may be all that is needed for survival (CITE). Most birds are generally able to fly to safety, but can be fatally attracted to the prey escaping from the edges of a wildfire (CITE). Wildfire effects on aquatic wildlife, such as fish and amphibians, is variable. These animals are not usually directly affected by widlfire events, and are often able to swim to deeper and cooler waters when temperatures become excessive. Insects and other invertebrates living in snags, live vegetation, and on the forest floor may be killed.

Following a wildfire, insect populations may erupt and provide food for insect-eating birds and other predators. Forage often increases in quantity and protein content for a year or more, potentially benefiting deer, elk, and other browsing animal populations. Snags and downed trees may also provide safe habitat for small mammals, birds, bats, insects, spiders, and other critters.

Insects and Diseases

Native Plants

Native Animals

Invasive Species

2004 Oregon Websites and Watersheds Project, Inc.